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Rescuers carry a worker who was trapped in a gold mine to an ambulance in the city of Qixia in China's Shandong province. Eleven workers trapped for two weeks by an explosion inside the mine were brought safely to the surface on Sunday. Chen Hao/AP hide caption

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Chen Hao/AP

11 Miners Rescued In China After 2 Weeks Trapped Below Ground

The workers became trapped on Jan. 10 following an unexplained explosion at a gold mine in the eastern province of Shandong. One miner has died and another 10 remain missing.

A woman walks in a park along Yangtze River in Wuhan on Jan. 19, 2021. Residents of the city of 11 million, which was the first epicenter of COVID-19, have conflicting emotions as they reckon with the aftermath of the virus and their 76-day lockdown. Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images

Wuhan's Lockdown Memories One Year Later: Pride, Anger, Deep Pain

Jan. 23 marks the one-year anniversary of the strict lockdown imposed on the first epicenter of COVID-19. For thousands of residents, the physical and emotional marks remain.

Wuhan's Lockdown Memories One Year Later: Pride, Anger, Deep Pain

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A sign warns against the Covid-19 virus near the Navajo town of Tuba City, Ariz. As the virus rages across the U.S., mitigation measures continue to be critical to save lives. Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images

The Vaccine Rollout Will Take Time. Here's What The U.S. Can Do Now To Save Lives

With the virus still raging in the U.S., public health experts say we can't afford to just wait around for the vaccine. They share advice for what communities can do now to slow the death toll.

Caucus goers during last year's disastrous Iowa Democratic caucus. Democrats are now weighing whether the predominantly white, rural state should keep its prized place at the front of the presidential nominating process. Steve Pope/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Pope/Getty Images

Democrats Weigh Whether Iowa Should Stay 1st In Line For 2024 Election

Iowa Public Radio News

Iowa's decades-long lock on the nominating process has been under threat since last year's disastrous caucus, when results were delayed for days due in part to a faulty smartphone app.

Facebook's oversight board is considering what to do about Donald Trump's accounts. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Facebook Oversight Board Co-Chair On Determining The Future Of Trump's Accounts

Facebook oversight board co-chair Jamal Greene tells NPR about what the board is considering as it weighs whether to allow Donald Trump back onto Facebook and Instagram.

Facebook Oversight Board Co-Chair On Determining The Future Of Trump's Accounts

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The acting head of the U.S. Agency for Global Media has fired the presidents and boards of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Radio Free Asia and the Middle East Broadcasting Networks. Above, the headquarters of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty is seen in Prague in January 2010. Michal Kamaryt/Associated Press hide caption

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Michal Kamaryt/Associated Press

USAGM Chief Fires Trump Allies Over Radio Free Europe And Other Networks

The acting head of the U.S. Agency for Global Media fired the presidents and boards over three not-for-profit international networks who were appointed by an ally of former President Trump.

David Gilkey and his mother Alyda. Layla Miller hide caption

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Layla Miller

Alyda Gilkey On The Life And Legacy Of Her Son David, Who Put 'Pictures On The Radio'

Gilkey died in 2016 while on assignment in Afghanistan. His mother, Alyda Gilkey, remembers the man behind the lens: an adventurous soul who had a way of putting his subjects at ease.

Alyda Gilkey On The Life And Legacy Of Her Son David, Who Put 'Pictures On The Radio'

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Julie Benbassat for NPR

She Resisted Getting Her Kids The Usual Vaccines. Then The Pandemic Hit

A mother of three in Canada was opposed to getting her kids vaccinated against childhood diseases. The pandemic led her out of that movement. Getting there was a years-long search for answers.

She Resisted Getting Her Kids The Usual Vaccines. Then The Pandemic Hit

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Chantelly Manzanares grades her daughter Rosabella's spelling test. Because her mother is deaf, Rosabella sometimes uses American Sign Language to interpret what's happening in her classes on Zoom. Kristin Gourlay hide caption

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Kristin Gourlay

Parents With Disabilities Face Extra Hurdles With Kids' Remote Schooling

Parents with disabilities often face extra issues with remote learning. A deaf mom whose first language is American Sign Language is navigating the challenge of monitoring her hearing child's work.

Parents With Disabilities Face Extra Hurdles With Kids' Remote Schooling

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Harper

The Trojan Women — And Many More — Speak Up In 'A Thousand Ships'

Natalie Haynes's new book tells the epic story of the Trojan War from the perspectives of the women involved in it. And that means all the women — from Troy and Sparta, goddesses, Amazons and more.

The Trojan Women — And Many More — Speak Up In 'A Thousand Ships'

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The U.S. Postal Service is still struggling to deal with mail sent during the recent holiday season. Quinn Klinefelter/NPR hide caption

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Quinn Klinefelter/NPR

'There's No End In Sight': Mail Delivery Delays Continue Across The Country

WDET 101.9 FM

The U.S. Postal Service is still digging out from under an avalanche of mail sent over the holidays. Plus, the system has been strained by the impact of COVID-19 on its workflow and workforce.

'There's No End In Sight': Mail Delivery Delays Continue Across The Country

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A patron, who did not want to give his name, uses the lottery ticket vending kiosk at a Smoker Friendly store to purchase tickets for the Mega Millions lottery drawing in Cranberry Township, Penn. The jackpot for the Mega Millions lottery game grew to $1 billion ahead of Friday night's drawing after months without a winner. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

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Keith Srakocic/AP

Who Wants To Be A Billionaire? $1 Billion Winning Lottery Ticket Sold In Michigan

It's the third-largest lotto jackpot in U.S. history. The odds of winning the top prize were 1 in 302.5 million.

The social network MeWe is among a number of apps seeing an influx of users after Facebook and Twitter kicked off former President Donald Trump. Chesnot/Getty Images hide caption

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Chesnot/Getty Images

Fast-Growing Alternative To Facebook And Twitter Finds Post-Trump Surge 'Messy'

Social network MeWe began as a privacy-focused alternative to Facebook. Trump supporters and right-wing groups disillusioned with mainstream social media have flocked to it since the Jan. 6 riot.

President Biden speaks on his administration's response to the economic crisis in the State Dining Room of the White House on Friday. Ken Cedeno/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ken Cedeno/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Opinion: Joe Biden's Lifetime Of Experience

NPR's Scott Simon reflects on the life and career of the nation's newest, and oldest, president.

Opinion: Joe Biden's Lifetime Of Experience

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Retired U.S. Army Gen. Lloyd Austin was confirmed as the next secretary of defense. He is seen above speaking after being nominated by then-President-elect Joe Biden last month. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Lloyd Austin Confirmed As Secretary of Defense, Becomes First Black Pentagon Chief

Austin's near-unanimous confirmation came despite concerns raised on both sides of the aisle that he hadn't been out of uniform for the legally-mandated minimum seven-year period.

South Korea's KF94 mask does a good job concealing Mona Lisa's smile — but how effective is it at preventing coronavirus spread? Above: masked pedestrians in a shopping district in Seoul. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Coronavirus FAQ: Why Am I Suddenly Hearing So Much About KF94 Masks?

There are N95s, reserved for health workers. There are KN95s, which you can buy easily — except that quality may vary. And now South Korea's KF94 masks are getting a lot of buzz.

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