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Wind turbines near Dwight, Ill. and a pump jack in Cotulla, Texas. The presidential candidates have opposing views on the future of U.S. energy. Scott Olson and Loren Elliott/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson and Loren Elliott/AFP/Getty Images

There's A Lot At Stake For The Climate In The 2020 Election

Despite the cascade of other crises this year, climate change has emerged as a key election issue. The two presidential candidates' positions on it could not be more different.

An election worker uses an electronic pollbook to check voters at a polling station in the Echo Park Recreation Complex in Los Angeles on March 3, 2020. Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Voter Websites In California And Florida Could Be Vulnerable To Hacks, Report Finds

Cyber experts told the Department of Homeland Security in July that voter registration systems in California and Florida could be vulnerable to a hack, a closely-held report obtained by NPR reveals.

Angela Settles' husband Darius died of COVID-19, on July 4th. He was 30 years old, had no underlying conditions and was the youngest fatality in Nashville at that point. Blake Farmer/WPLN News hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN News

Hospital Bills For Uninsured COVID-19 Patients Are Covered, But No One Tells Them

WPLN News

The CARES Act provides funds to pay medical bills for uninsured COVID-19 patients. But the death of a young man in Nashville shows people often don't know about the program until it's too late.

Former President Barack Obama addresses Biden-Harris supporters during a drive-in rally in Philadelphia on Wednesday. Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Entreating Pa. Residents To Vote, Obama Delivers Rebuke Of Trump

"What we do these next 13 days will matter for decades to come," the former president said. Barack Obama also used his speech as an opportunity to reflect on his personal relationship with his former vice president.

Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe during his earlier tenure in the House. He delivered a briefing on election threats on Wednesday evening. Gabriella Demczuk/AP hide caption

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Gabriella Demczuk/AP

U.S. Blames Iran For Threatening Election Emails, Says Russia May Interfere Too

The director of national intelligence and FBI director said on Wednesday night that U.S. officials believe Iranian influence-mongers are behind an election-intimidation scam.

Mac Phipps. Dale Edwin Murray for NPR hide caption

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Dale Edwin Murray for NPR

To Outsmart The Devil: How The Louisiana Justice System Failed Rapper Mac Phipps

Prisoner exploitation and sexual assault allegations. A Supreme Court ruling that could hold the key to freedom. In the last installment of Mac's story, we follow the ripples of his case 20 years after his manslaughter conviction.

Researchers say 70% of nursing homes are for-profit, and low staffing is common. Jackyenjoyphotography/Getty Images hide caption

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Jackyenjoyphotography/Getty Images

For-Profit Nursing Homes' Pleas For Government Money Brings Scrutiny

For-profit nursing homes say the coronavirus has left them almost broke and needing financial help from the government. But critics say their business model is the problem.

For-Profit Nursing Homes' Pleas For Government Money Brings Scrutiny

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The remnants of Hurricane Sandy churn up Lake Michigan in Chicago in 2012. Flood risk in the city is increasing as climate change drives more extreme rain, and renters face greater financial peril than homeowners. More than half of Chicagoans are renters, according to 2019 census data. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Most Tenants Get No Information About Flooding. It Can Cost Them Dearly

Most landlords are not required to disclose if a property is in a flood plain or has flooded before. That's a big problem in cities where climate change is driving more frequent and severe floods.

David Xol of Guatemala hugs his son Byron as they were reunited at Los Angeles International Airport in January. The father and son were separated 18 months earlier under the Trump administration's "no tolerance" migration policy. Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP hide caption

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Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP

Parents Of 545 Children Separated At U.S.-Mexico Border Still Can't Be Found

A court filing said many of the parents are presumed to no longer be in the United States. Efforts to locate them have been hampered by the coronavirus pandemic, according to the filing.

Cha Pornea for NPR

FAFSA Applications Are Open. Here's How To Fill It Out This Year

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid is now open to potential college students to fill out. Here's how to fill out the form to get money for college — and why you should apply now instead of waiting.

FAFSA Applications Are Open. Here's How To Fill It Out This Year

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Senate Democrats speak Oct. 12 after the confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett before the Judiciary Committee. They announced Wednesday they will boycott the committee vote on confirming Barrett. Stefani Reynolds/AP hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AP

Democrats Plan To Boycott Senate Committee Vote On Barrett Nomination

Democrats see Mitch McConnell's rush to confirm Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett as unprecedented and "outrageous," but they have little power to stop it in a GOP-controlled Senate.

In his book How To, Randall Munroe explores whether you could open enough water bottles to fill a swimming pool — using nuclear weapons. Riverhead Books hide caption

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Riverhead Books

Randall Munroe's Absurd Scientific Advice For Real-World Problems

Randall Munroe, the cartoonist behind the popular Internet comic xkcd, finds complicated solutions to simple, real-world problems. In the process, he reveals a lot about science and why the real world is sometimes even weirder than we expect.

Randall Munroe's Absurd Scientific Advice For Real-World Problems

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Protesters chant and sing solidarity songs as they barricade barricade the Lagos-Ibadan expressway on Wednesday to protest against police brutality and the killing of protesters by the military, at Magboro, Ogun State, Nigeria. Pius Utomi Ekpei/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Pius Utomi Ekpei/AFP via Getty Images

'Hope Is Lost' As Police Open Fire On Pro-Reform Protesters In Lagos, Nigeria

The protests began about two weeks ago demanding an end to police brutality. Now, as one activist said, "it has become so many things for so many Nigerians." The government declared a 24-hour curfew.

The Justice Department alleges Google has an illegal monopoly in search, setting up the biggest confrontation with a tech giant in more than 20 years. Don Ryan/AP hide caption

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Don Ryan/AP

Google Lawsuit Marks End Of Washington's Love Affair With Big Tech

The Justice Department's lawsuit against Google is the clearest sign yet of the "Techlash" that has politicians on both sides of the aisle bristling at the power of Silicon Valley.

Google Lawsuit Marks End Of Washington's Love Affair With Big Tech

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Friederike Seyfried, director of Antique Egyptian Department of the Neues Museum in Berlin, shows media a stain from liquid on the Sarcophagus of the prophet Ahmose on Wednesday. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP

Dozens Of Artifacts Apparently Vandalized At Berlin's Museums

Police, who believe vandalism to be the cause, are unsure of the motive. German media is speculating a link to a conspiracy theory. The extent of the damage won't be clear until after restoration.

President Trump on Wednesday commuted the sentences of five individuals, four of whom had been sentenced on drug charges and a fifth who was serving time for food stamp fraud. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Trump Grants Clemency To 5, Most Incarcerated For Drug Offenses

The White House described all of the individuals as having been model inmates during their incarcerations who had worked to better themselves and the people around them while still behind bars.

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